Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran
Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran
How to perform dentistry faster, easier, higher in quality and lower in cost.
Blog By:
howard
howard

382 DSM Boot Camp with Glennine Varga : Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

382 DSM Boot Camp with Glennine Varga : Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

5/2/2016 9:13:39 AM   |   Comments: 0   |   Views: 345

382


Listen on iTunes

382


Watch Video here

VIDEO - DUwHF #382 - Glennine Varga


Stream Audio here

AUDIO - DUwHF #382 - Glennine Varga


Glennine Varga is a certified TMD assistant and educator with an AA of sciences. She is a certified TMD assistant with the American Academy of Crainofacial Pain (AACP). She has been employed in dental education for over 18 years. She has been a TMD/Sleep Apnea trainer and speaker with emphasis on medical billing and documentation for over ten years. Glennine is the owner of DSM Boot Camp and co-founder of DSM Interactive Team Training (DSMITT) with Jan Palmer. Glennine has trained and assisted hundreds of dental offices on practice management, TMD/Sleep Apnea, medical billing and team training. She is proud to speak along side Dr. Steve Carstensen for the American Dental Association (ADA) dental sleep medicine course and The Pankey Institute dental sleep medicine course. 

www.DSMBootCamp.com 

Howard:

It is a huge honor today to be podcast interviewing Glennie Varga. Did I say that right?

 

Glennine:

Glennine.

 

Howard:

Glennine Varga.

 

Glennine:

Yes.

 

Howard:

I contacted you. You didn’t contact me because you're in this new, big, hot area. You've been in a long time, sleep medicine, but it seems to be that … I got out of school in ’87. I’ve almost done this 30 years. It seems like about two years ago to 30 years ago, no one ever talked about this and now, it’s just gone off and you just can’t throw a cat without hearing someone about it. When and how did you get involved with sleep medicine?

 

Glennine:

Actually, it started when I was in the dental practice. I was in the dental practice for 13 years in Colorado and my dentist came home from a weekend course and said, “We’re going to do dental sleep medicine.” I said, “What? What the heck is that?” He said, “Well, I want to make oral appliances to help patients breathe better at night.” This started probably in 2001 in the dental practice that I was in. We just took off with it and we started to work with physicians in our area and started helping patients.

 

 

One of my biggest goals as a dental assistant in the practice was to learn how to bill medical insurance. Obviously, that was a scary task but I accomplished it and I actually was privileged enough to work for Rose Nierman in Dental Writer software. I was there for 10 years, five years part time, five years full time. I got to learn all of the ins and outs of billing medical not only for sleep apnea but also for TMD. I’ve got a heavy background in that. I’ve been privileged enough to see all the great lectures, speak about sleep and see and learn all about it. It’s just been a great journey. It’s been really fun.

 

Howard:

Now, spell Rose’s last name.

 

Glennine:

Nierman, N-I-E-R-M-A-N. She’s the owner of Nierman Practice Management Dental Writer software.

 

Howard:

Isn’t she at Florida?

 

Glennine:

Yes.

 

Howard:

Who was the dentist you worked for?

 

Glennine:

I worked for Jim Beck out of Colorado.

 

Howard:

B-E-C-K?

 

Glennine:

Correct.

 

Howard:

Denver?

 

Glennine:

In Pueblo, Colorado.

 

Howard:

Pueblo.

 

Glennine:

We specialized in neuromuscular full mouth reconstruction.

 

Howard:

Wow. That’s an amazing background. I think it’s funny, the medical billing, it’s funny because when they first came out with computers … This is in the late ‘80s in dentistry. They said in just like a year or so, everyone’s going to be paperless. It seems like 30 years later, there’s more … When I had my physical, you have to sign the blood thing. You have to sign the note here. You feel like a lawyer. We’re, most everyone listening, using dental insurance and they think that’s a pain in the ass but isn’t medical insurance at 10 times greater pain in the rear end than dental insurance? What’s your thoughts on that?

 

Glennine:

It could be, absolutely. Anytime a dentist bills medical, they have to prove medical necessity. This is something that Rose Nierman really prided herself on teaching the dental community how to prove medical necessity through narratives and diagnostic coding. The good news is with dental sleep medicine, and nobody likes to talk about Medicare but Medicare came out in 2011 and wrote a policy that they basically have an allowable amount for oral appliances for sleep apnea.

 

 

One of the greatest things about this policy, it’s called the LCD, the local coverage determination, in that policy, it states that Medicare will only pay a dentist for the oral appliance. This is a really great thing. It’s great news for dentists because although they still have to prove medical necessity, it gives them the right and the place to bill medical insurance in the medical world. It’s actually been a really great thing. Once you learn the process, especially for sleep apnea, it becomes very routine. The codes don’t change. The way you fill up the claim form is the same. It actually works out pretty well.

 

Howard:

Your website is DSM Boot Camp. What’s DSM?

 

Glennine:

Dental sleep medicine.

 

Howard:

It’s dental sleep … Obviously, you're not going to be able to teach people how to bill a medical insurance on a podcast. How are you training? Is this all online? Do you give seminars? Do you like to lecture to dental societies? Are you going to build us an online CE course on Dentaltown? Would that be good?

 

Glennine:

All of the above. Absolutely.

 

Howard:

Would that be good or would that hurt your business? If you put a course on Dentaltown, would that drive you more business or take away your business?

 

Glennine:

I don't think so. Basically, what I like to pride myself in is every office I work with is unique. They have different needs. Just like a dental practice, I will do almost an exam with an interview with each dentist to find out what exactly they’re struggling with and what it is that they need. When it comes to online education, I can give them generalized information, let’s say for Dentaltown, in an online setting but each office will have some specific need that they encounter. I could be there to customize my training to them.

 

 

In fact, one of the people that helped create OSA University which is online training for team, I created all of the courses that are set online so team members can go and watch and get a general idea, a universal idea of what’s going on. Then, I can step in as a consultant to really take that and hone in on what it is they truly need help with. I would love to team up with Dentaltown and create online courses because I feel that the masses need the education on the basic fundamentals and then those that are really involved will definitely need some additional customized training as well.

 

Howard:

What was the first website you said where you already have these on? OS … What was it?

 

Glennine:

I worked for a company called OSA University which are-

 

Howard:

OSA University.

 

Glennine:

I’m no longer with the company. I did help create the courses. They’re selling those to the masses now. That’s a really good thing because everyone’s getting a good fundamental knowledge.

 

Howard:

What does OSA stand for?

 

Glennine:

Obstructive Sleep Airway.

 

Howard:

Obstructive Sleep Airway. I never heard of that. What’s the URL on that? What’s the www?

 

Glennine:

I think it’s osauniversity.org. I worked for them for two years and we built the courses but as I said before, I’m no longer with them. I’m on my own doing some consulting. It’s a great platform to get basic fundamental education out. Obviously, looking at Dentaltown, I think Dentaltown could create something similar to have some good basic fundamental information for the masses.

 

Howard:

You've been in this a long time. I want to give away your age because most women don’t like to admit they’re 40. You're in the big 40, are you?

 

Glennine:

I just got braces.

 

Howard:

I know. You look like you could easily be my daughter and I’m in the 50s now. If I was 57 and since I’m from Kansas, you could definitely be my daughter but at 53, it’d be … Do you really think this is going somewhere? Do you really think dentistry, the dental profession has a big part of the solution to sleep medicine?

 

Glennine:

Absolutely.

 

Howard:

Where I want to go with this is a lot of times, people start talking about giving directions on how to drive from Phoenix to LA when 200,000 dentists out there are thinking, “Well, why the hell do I want to go to LA?” Let’s back up a little bit. I believe a lot of dentists are … If you're an old guy like me, you've seen so many fads come and go. They come, they go. They come, they go. Is this a fad or is this for real? Let’s talk about why we should drive from Phoenix to LA before giving instructions? Why do you think this is not a fad? Why do you think dentistry is part of the solution for dental sleep medicine?

 

Howard:

I think that dentistry is a solution for dental sleep medicine because number one, there are 20 million people right now that are walking around with some type of obstructive airway. All these 20million people are probably not going to be diagnosed unless they are educated to and when you go to the traditional medical doctor’s office, a lot of times they're focused on the patient’s chief complaint which a lot of times isn’t sleep. It could be because patients are unaware that they have an obstructed breathing problem at night. In a dental practice, it’s the perfect scenario because in a dental practice, we have time to sit down and educate the patients. Dentists, we’re mechanics. Dentists figure out why something is functioning or why something’s not functioning and figure out a way to fix it.

 

 

I know you had people like Dr. Ken Smith and Dr. Erin Elliott on. They have a lot of passion for figuring out how can we help people breathe better. I really, really think that being in a dental practice is the perfect fit for this because as a team and as a team member, we have the ability to identify this educate our patients. Let’s face it. We spend an hour with their patients when they come in for visits versus three minutes when they walk into a medical doctor’s office. I really feel that this is the wave of the future when it comes to dentistry. I think that it's actually a bigger thing than implant was when implants hit the industry.

 

 

With the new technology that's coming out, for example, Dr. John Remmers and Zephyr MATRx, the stuff that they're coming out with these days is so absolutely mind-blowing amazing that I don’t see the industry going anywhere else but heading towards dental sleep medicine and helping patients breathe better at night because most people don't have any idea that there's anything going on.

 

Howard:

What was that last thing you talked about, those two dentists? Who were that and they made what?

 

Glennine:

Dr. John Remmers. He’s actually a physician. John Remmers was the first person to develop the first home sleep test unit and he has developed a matrix for Zephyr Company. The MATRx is something that is used in a sleep lab that titrates, that moves the lower jaw forward to find the most perfect position for the airway. They're coming out with some things. I just found out this morning, I’m super excited about, and I think that with these new technologies really hitting the industry, I really see that this is going to hit the masses of dentistry. I really feel that and I hope in my lifetime that oral appliances for sleep are as popular and as widely used as bleaching trays in dental practices.

 

Howard:

Where is this John Remmers out of?

 

Glennine:

They are in Canada. The company is working really hard to find out the most ideal position for the mandible to be placed during a sleep test so that an oral appliance can be fabricated. The way of thinking with, let's say the American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine, is to protrude the lower jaw at a certain percentage like 60 or 70% of their maximum protrusion but Dr. Remmers is looking at what can we do to find the exact position per each patient because it may not be 60 to 70%. Nobody really knows until each patient is tested to find out what's the ideal position. I think with new technology and as we start to learn a little bit more about why we sleep and why it's important to sleep, I really feel that the future is headed towards dental sleep medicine with a lot of dentists looking at making oral appliances for patients.

 

Howard:

Can you introduce me to John?

 

Glennine:

Absolutely.

 

Howard:

Shoot me an e-mail. I'm howard@dentaltown.com and shoot me an e-mail. I'd like to hear more about that. The thing that I always think about is, at sleep medicine, is it's always the customer first. It's always the patient first. I remember when digital radiography came out. Dentists were always talking about whether like it or not. I said the discussion’s all wrong. I mean what does the patient … Would they rather look at a one-inch film on view box that they can’t take home or an eight-by-ten white sheet of paper with their tooth on it.

 

 

It’s patient mastery to be able to take home your eight-by-ten X-ray and show your loved one the cavity or the root canal or whatever. I see in America, eight to 30,000 Americans die each year from the flu and the last point of entry in the US healthcare system about, depending on the year, 20% to 40% of that time, the last person they saw was a dental office. Why shouldn’t a hygienist be given a flu shot? It sounds like you're saying the same thing, that if 20 million people have this, their last point of entry might have been getting a cleaning with a hygienist at the dental office or whatever when we could have been asking them this question.

 

Glennine:

Exactly.

 

Howard:

Then, the next question’s kind of crude and rude but is there any money in sleep medicine?

 

Glennine:

Absolutely. Medical, as I mentioned earlier, in 2011, Medicare came out and said that a dentist should be billing for the oral appliance and only a dentist can actually bill and provide the oral appliance to a patient. That really put the dentistry on the map because nowhere in history has Medicare ever said they’re going to approve a procedure specifically to a dentist. That's really big news.

 

Howard:

Was that the first time?

 

Glennine:

That’s the first time in history that Medicare's ever approved a procedure specifically to a dentist.

 

Howard:

You should write the up and put that in the Dentaltown magazine.

 

Glennine:

I can do that.

 

Howard:

Send it to me and I'll push it out on social media out there or make up a post on that.

 

Glennine:

Yeah, I would love to.

 

Howard:

You should make a post of that. That’d be your inaugural on Dentaltown because you know what, it’s funny because every time you go get a physical by the doctor, your physician and he always says to me, “Okay, open your mouth and say ah,” and he’d put some popsicles down and says ah, I’m thinking, “Hey, I’m a dentist for 30 years. What the hell could you have seen? You just said ah. I mean you don’t have lubes on. You didn’t pull out my tongue.” It’s just a reflex form. This is pretty cool that they just covered a procedure then they’ve decided only dentists should be doing an oral appliance. That’s huge.

 

Glennine:

Medicare is the strictest of all strict and they feel … I think that by them coming out and saying that a dentist should get reimbursed for this procedure, I think it's two things, one, that the oral appliances work because Medicare's not going to pay for a procedure that they don't feel is needed, is medically necessary and two, that a dentist has a role in the medical profession and that a dentist is seen now as somebody that is providing a medically necessary treatment. I think those two points are really big.

 

 

When you talk about is there money in this, if the strictest of all strict insurance is saying yes, these oral appliances work and yes, we have an allowable amount for it, I think that that obviously carries on to the private insurances and the private insurance companies are having reimbursements and allowable amount for this as well. Even though the focus is on insurance and the focus is on Medicare paying, I really think as you mentioned before, the patient, this should they should be patient centric.

 

 

This should make the patient aware that there is a problem and we should build value into these oral appliances because just imagine if you know somebody that snores or you know somebody that's been diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea, if they're not given an oral appliance as an option to treatment, then they're given a CPAP or PAP therapy or they're given possibly surgery. Surgery was just found in the most recent years that it's not as successful as they like it to be.

 

 

Really, patients are walking out with one option which is the PAP therapy. That’s the mask that blows air into your mouth. A lot of patients don't want to wear it. They’re just intolerable to it. They don't want to have anything to do with it. Here, we have oral appliance that’s non-pharmaceutical. It’s non-surgical. It’s completely removable. It’s something very simple that they can wear. Most of the time, you don't even know that it's in their mouth and it's going to have a huge impact on their overall health and wellness so why not?

 

 

The biggest thing that I talked with my teams about is that in dentistry, you've been in dentistry for a while. The maximum benefit with dental insurance has been a thousand dollars since 1960. It’s not changed. It hasn’t increased with inflation but yet, the dental profession has found a way to educate the patient on the therapy and overcome the fact that the insurance isn’t going to cover their entire treatment plan. We actually look at the insurance as, okay, it’s just a drop in the bucket. It's a coupon, if you will. We don’t really, most of us in dentistry, don't base treatment plans off of whether or not the insurance is going to pay.

 

 

Now that we look at dental sleep medicine, we have to carry that on into the dental profession with our team meaning we've got to educate our patients about the value of wearing these oral appliances and not necessarily focus on the insurance and what they pay but more importantly, why it's going to help the patient's overall health and wellness and the value of these oral appliances and paying for them. I really feel that there's a big industry in dental sleep medicine. I do think that there is money involved in it. Obviously, each dentist is going to have a different fee for their therapy but I would say on a low end, it’s going to be $2,500 for a therapy case all the way up to whatever the dentists are charging. I've heard a lot of dentists going as high as seven, $8,000 for their therapy. I really feel that there's definitely an economic boost in this.

 

Howard:

How many in your long career at this … I mean you've been doing just this for almost 16 years. How many dentist s out there do you think just do this and stop doing root canals, fillings and crowns and just do sleep medicine? Do you think that's a target for a lot of dentists listening to you today or do you see it more as just another tool in your toolbox, you'll still do cleaning and exams, fillings, root canals and all that stuff and sleep medicine might be 5% of your practice? Where do you see this? Some of these guys I’d podcast interview, it’s all they do. They decided just to specialize in it like an orthodontist, endodontist, periodontist. How many people do you know that have just said, “That's it. I'm only doing this,” versus it’s mainly a part time thing in your office?

 

Glennine:

I see a very high percentage of people that just drop everything in dentistry and go straight to dental sleep medicine but I see that because it's my profession. It's my industry. It’s what I'm engulfed in.

 

Howard:

How many people out there are like that that used to be dentist and only do sleep medicine?

 

Glennine:

I would say if we look at all of the dentists in the country, let’s say there’s 150,000 dentists in the US, I would say that 20,000 of those dentists are doing some sort of sleep appliance whether they're getting patients tested or just using snore guards. They’re doing some sort of dental sleep appliance. I'm basing that off of looking at a lab kind of like Glidewell Lab where they sell the Silencer appliance and they're selling thousands of those a month to dentists across the country. I would say about 20,000 are doing something with dental sleep medicine.

 

 

I would say probably, when you look at the American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine, they've got … I don't know exactly what their membership numbers are but I’m going to say their membership’s probably anywhere about 3,000 people. These are people that are serious about dental sleep medicine. I would say those type of people are doing anywhere from five or less appliances a month. Those types of people are very serious. Then, you take out of those 3,000, there's probably maybe 500 of those that are dedicated solely to dental sleep medicine and making that their practice and that's all they do.

 

 

Of course, I work with a lot of those because again, that's my industry and that's who I’d like to glean information off of and learn from but I would say as an overall, as far as the masses, most of them are going to add it into their toolbox like you said and have it there as something that they're able to offer their patients. Like I said before, I'd love to see it where it’s as popular as bleaching trays with every practice, that they have some sort of sleep appliance that they can offer patients. One of my favorites out there is Dr. Steve Carstensen. He did exactly what you just said. He just sold his restorative practice and now, he's doing all exclusive dental sleep medicine. It's really because the industry drove him to. He had so many referring physicians sending to him. He got so many patients needing this.

 

Howard:

Where is he out of?

 

Glennine:

Seattle.

 

Howard:

Steve Carston?

 

Glennine:

Steve Carstensen. Dr. Steve Carstensen-

 

Howard:

Spell Carstensen.

 

Glennine:

C-A-R-S-T-E-N-S-E-N.

 

Howard:

E-N-S-E-N.

 

Glennine:

Yes. Actually, Dr. Carstensen and John Remmers teach the course, the dental sleep medicine course over at Spear and also at the Pankey Institute. Dr. Carstensen teaches the course for the ADA in dental sleep medicine. He's invited me to teach the team portion of that. He's one of my idols because you know he's done exactly what you just said and he's gone exclusive dental sleep medicine.

 

Howard:

I’m going to put you both out of business because I'm going to go back to the CPAP and I'm going to go to Victoria's Secret and have them make a Victoria's Secret CPAP mask so people want to wear their CPAP machine.

 

Glennine:

Hey, that'd be great. That means that people are getting treated. I love it.

 

Howard:

What do they call it in medicine, the insurance? Is it DRGs, diagnostic related groups? It used to be like say you had a tonsillectomy and these physicians are billing out all this stuff. Then, finally, Medicaid and Medicare said stop it, we're just going to have … Is it called the DRG or we’re just going to have a diagnostic related group for a tonsillectomy?

 

Glennine:

Sure.

 

Howard:

Is that how sleep medicine works? Do they just say sleep medicine is 1PDRG or do you itemize that for taking home a machine, reading a diagnosis, oral appliance? Is it all a bunch of little different separate fees or is it just one code for a DRG?

 

Glennine:

It just depends. I’m a big stickler working with Medicare and I've teamed up with Jan Palmer. She's actually a office manager for Dr. Gail Demko. Dr. Demko is a dentist that’s been doing dental sleep medicine for over 25 years. She is one of the past presidents of the AADSM. Again, she's one of my idols. I absolutely love her. She's one of the pioneers in all of this. In their office, because they are a Medicare supplier, these oral appliances are considered durable medical equipment. What they've done in their practice is they’ve set their protocol to meet Medicare standards across the board. Every patient that’s coming into their practice is treated as though they were a Medicare patient meaning that they're going to follow the strictest of all strict when it comes to insurance.

 

 

The reason I bring that up is because with Medicare, a dentist is seen as a durable medical equipment, DME supplier. It’s no different as though they were a store that sold wheelchairs or crutches or CPAPs. Being a dentist, as a DME supplier, you're seen as a store. What that means is when you bill it out to Medicare, you’re billing out only the oral appliance. It’s considered an umbrella code meaning everything that you do for that appliance falls under the one code.

 

 

If you were to set your practice up to do just bill out the DME, the durable medical equipment as a supplier like a storefront, it makes the billing process very, very simple because you're just billing out the oral device but you will have offices that are not set up to follow Medicare protocol. There are things that you can bill out to the medical insurance in addition to the oral appliance. For example, the evaluation of the patient for the oral appliance may be a panel X-ray to make sure that the teeth are okay to support an oral device. All of those things can be billed out to medical insurance.

 

 

The key here is that those things can be billed out to medical once the patient has been diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea. If the patient hasn’t been diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea, it's really not within the scope of a dental license to bill any type of testing. This has been probably the biggest controversy in dental sleep medicine today, is because dentists are purchasing home sleep testing units and they're using it to screen their patients to see if they stopped breathing at night, to see if they have a problem.

 

 

According to Medicare, they want that patient to only do a sleep test as a result of a face-to-face evaluation with a physician. When we talk about diagnosing and dentists using home sleep monitors and evaluating everything, it's very important that we just stick, when it comes to billing, that we just stick to billing the oral appliance and billing anything after the patient has been diagnosed, not necessarily billing the diagnostic part of that.

 

Howard:

How do you recommend the dentist get a physician relationship to get the diagnosis at sleep medicine?

 

Glennine:

Insurances like to dictate a lot. What we've been seeing in the history of insurance for sleep is that when a patient goes to get diagnosed with sleep apnea, they really have two choices. They can use a home sleep monitor or they could go to sleep lab or a PSG. What's happening is the insurance companies are saying, “Oh, when they go to a sleep lab, we have to pay the sleep tech and we pay a lot more for the patient to get that that sleep study done.” What the insurance companies are saying is they want patients to do a home sleep test before they do a PSG. A lot of these sleep labs are seeing their business start to go away because the patients have to go through additional testing before they can be put into their beds.

 

 

As a dentist is looking at getting patients diagnosed, now's the perfect time for dentist to go into one of those sleep labs and say, “Hey, listen. I could be a huge referral source for you. I’ve got a base of 2,000 active patients. I know by statistics that 27% of those patients are going to have an issue. 27% of those 2,000 patients, I can start referring to you to obtain a diagnosis.” One of the biggest issues there is if you were a dentist and you said I want to send my patient to the sleep lab, depending on your state laws and depending on that patient's insurance, there may need to be a physician involved to originate that study.

 

 

I’m working on some projects that will bring dentists and physicians together. I know that the industry is as well. I think as we start to see the future of dental sleep medicine evolve, we’ll start to see those come together a little bit more. There's some great programs out there. I just talked with one called Sleep Treatment Solutions and they are based out of Colorado. They've got a board-certified sleep physician that will read the sleep test once the dentist has the patient do a home sleep test. They also have that same physician that will write a prescription for the oral appliance. As I mentioned before, as we evolve, we’re going to see a lot of easier solutions start to pop up for dentists that need that either face-to-face diagnosis or written prescription for the oral appliance. We’ll start to see that evolve a lot more.

 

Howard:

That's in Colorado, you said.

 

Glennine:

That’s in Colorado. Correct.

 

Howard:

I would think now that they legalized weed, that just one good bong hit, you’d sleep for 12 hours. I can imagine-

 

Glennine:

I think that there’s actually scientific research to back that up.

 

Howard:

Does weed help you sleep? Does marijuana help you sleep?

 

Glennine:

I thought I saw a research article posted on that not too long ago.

 

Howard:

I would agree with that because I had a couple of roommates in college that could never get up before noon. They were worshiping the weed the night before. I can clean the whole house, go to work eight hours and do my homework before those guys got out of bed. This is just really, really amazing. One thing you said, you're talking to several thousand dentists and you just basically said that you believe 27% of their practice, patients have some sort of obstructive sleep apnea?

 

Glennine:

Absolutely. It was a research study that came out I believe in 2006 by CHEST magazine. They did a big research study and they showed that about 27% of the population have obstructive sleep apnea. Like I said before, 90% of them have not been tested. They haven't been diagnosed. I would say that just roughly looking at your … Any dentist looking at their dentist patient base, about 27% of those are going to have an issue. It's just a matter of getting them diagnosed. Now, this was based off of one research study in 2006. I personally feel that it’s a lot higher than that.

 

Howard:

You like to teach the team members. What do you like to teach? Is this part of the team? Does that include the dentist, the assistant, the hygienist, the receptionist talking about how to talk to patients about it, how to screen for it? What are you teaching your teams?

 

Glennine:

All of the above. As I mentioned before, my training is very customized. I will interview the doc, find out exactly what they need and then hone in on that is part of the training but if somebody came to be completely green saying, “Glennine, I know nothing about this. Can you train me?” What I would probably set up is a good six-month protocol and within that six months, I'm going to really hone in on eight things, one, learning sleep basics, just understanding of sleep and why it's important to sleep and why we need to sleep because I really feel that the why is a big piece to this whole thing. Patients aren’t going to fork out $3,000 for an oral appliance unless they truly understand why it's going to help them. I really focus in on that.

 

 

I’m going to focus in on all of the forms and documentation needed to properly do this in a practice. We're going to focus on medical insurance. We're going to focus on Medicare depending on if the dentist wants to get involved with Medicare. We're going to focus on physician relations, like like you mentioned, going out into the community and working with different physicians so that we can obtain a diagnosis and written prescriptions for these things. We’re going to focus on a big thing that I think is huge, is patient perception. Patients walking in your practice, do they perceive you to know things about dental sleep medicine? Do they perceive you to be the go-to person in your community for this? We're going to focus on internal marketing, scripts with the team, how to talk to patients, really how to identify and screen this with the patient.

 

 

Then, finally, we're going to focus on financial responsibility, financial contracts because I feel that patients think that they're going to walk into your dental practice, hand you an insurance card, pay the $20 co-pay and be done. Unfortunately, most dentists are not in network with medical insurance. There's a specific finesse that we need when it comes to the team talking with the patients because they have to understand we're not just going to pay a $20 co-pay and be done.

 

 

However, if the dentist was in network with that insurance, it's possible they pay a $20 co-pay and be done. There's five financial arrangements that I go through with the team and presenting different contracts for the offices so that they understand exactly how to talk to patients. Really, my DSM Boot Camp is online education, live education, consulting over a certain amount of time and as I mentioned before, each office is different so it's really going to evolve around what they truly need and how we can vamp up what's going on with them.

 

Howard:

I think you're amazing to listen to. This is rolls of … You can tell it's coming right out of your heart, your passion. This is your mojo.

 

Glennine:

Thank you.

 

Howard:

It's amazing. I'm sitting here thinking maybe we should … Ryan, I was thinking maybe we should follow her podcast. Maybe she should try to line us up with Steve Carstensen and John-

 

Glennine:

Carstensen.

 

Howard:

Carstensen and John Remmers and maybe on Dentaltown, maybe you guys can start making some online CE courses because I really am concerned about the … I see the 150,000 dentists and I see 950,000 MDs and about 40,000 DOs and about 40,000 chiropractors. We really got to look at these 330 million Americans and seeing where are they going in and out of the healthcare system and 150,000 dentists is just a huge point of entry especially since you may never go to an endocrinologist in your entire life but people are routinely going to dentists.

 

Glennine:

Absolutely.

 

Howard:

A lot of those physicians, half of them are specialists. I'm never going to see an OBGYN. I've never seen an allergist. I've never seen half of these guys but they're just moving in and out to dental offices all day long. There’s a dentist on every corner. I think they should be doing flu shots, oral cancers, the HPV vaccine. I don't know why dentists aren’t giving flu shots. I don't know why they’re not given HPV vaccines. It sounds like they should be all screening for sleep medicine. It sounds like with Dentaltown having 210,000 members around the world, you guys should do some kind of online curriculum to get them to start thinking about it.

 

 

I will tell you, when I first started hearing about this, I actually went down in Phoenix to a place and had my sleep study. They said I sleep good but I think that test was bogus because when they did the test, I didn't have my two cats on me all night long going … I want to redo that test with Tigger and my Mimi in my bed crawling all over my face all night long seeing how that affects my sleep study.

 

Glennine:

There are plenty of home … What is that?

 

Howard:

That’s Tigger and she gets very mad when I stare at the computer screen all day. She doesn't know why I’m staring at the computer and not Tigger.

 

Glennine:

How cute. I love it. These home sleep testing units are amazing. There's so many of them out there and they're getting better and better every year. It is something that you can be tested within your own home with the cats and really truly evaluate what happens every night because that's a very important thing that you duplicate what you do every night. When you are taken out of your element and you’re put into something else, it doesn't quite duplicate what's going on. It wouldn't be a bad thing.

 

 

I’ve been traveling the country for several years in regards to dental sleep medicine and I do get to travel with these great companies that do have these home sleep testing units. I'll tell you that it's been like 70 to 80% of the dentists that are tested at the course come up to be having higher AHI than five meaning that they stop breathing more than five times an hour at night. That’s such a huge percentage. When we talk about 27% of your general dental patients will have something going on, I feel it’s a lot higher simply because that's what I've seen out in the industry, dentists that get tested at a course just like you would want to do with the home sleep test, had come back with positive indicators that there’s something going on. Doing those home sleep tests are a great-

 

Howard:

If I get the home sleep test, at what number would you say I would have to shoot my cats? You're saying five and above, I’ll actually shoot them?

 

Glennine:

Four or five.

 

Howard:

Above four or five? Would you recommend shooting them or eating them?

 

Glennine:

You don’t have to shoot them. Put them in a kennel. Just put them outside. It’s all about sleep hygiene.

 

Howard:

That was the best thing about that course because I remember I took that course with Dr. Michael Glass and we went to that course. That was the first I'd ever heard the word sleep hygiene and I was violating everything. I had a TV in my room. I had all these things. I did. I did that. I got rid of the electronics. You shouldn't charge your phone next to your bed. You shouldn't go to sleep with CNN on the background. I really did take it serious. I knew I was going to fail that sleep study test and I was really shocked when they said I didn’t. Give us names. What is a name of a good sleep study? These dentists, they wouldn’t want to go look at 20 different machines if this is your passion. If you can only buy one home sleep machine, what would you recommend?

 

Glennine:

Being in the dental practice, we use one type and one design. When I traveled the country, I really worked with one company. I’m more leaning towards that company because I'm very familiar with the technology but there are so many great ones that are out there that really, for a dentist, I would say shop around. Go to the AADSM, the American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine. They've got a meeting this year in Denver. That’s the best place to go to look at all of the different HST units that are out there. Our go-to was the WatchPAT from Itamar and it’s just-

 

Howard:

What’s the www? WatchPad?

 

Glennine:

WatchPAT, P-A-T, peripheral arterial tone. It’s the probe that goes on the finger and it’s able to measure the arterial tone which is also giving you information about how the patient sleeps.

 

Howard:

What’s the www on that?

 

Glennine:

I think it’s Itamar. I-T-A-M-A-R.com.

 

Howard:

I-T-A-M-A-R.com.

 

Glennine:

That was our favorite go-to but there's so many. I love Braebon. Braebon has a really great-

 

Howard:

Spell that.

 

Glennine:

B-R-E-A-B-O-N.

 

Howard:

Braebon.

 

Glennine:

Braebon. They’re out of Canada. They've got a couple of different units.

 

Howard:

It must be out of French Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Is it?

 

Glennine:

Yes.

 

Howard:

It sounds very French.

 

Glennine:

That’s a great unit. They're all good. They all get good data. A couple things that dentists look for is how much the disposables cost each time they use it. The WatchPAT is probably the most expensive with disposables at $60 a use and then there's other units that are less than $10 a use. It's always good to look at that but I also like making sure that the patient’s able to use it because a lot of times, with the effort belts and the cannulas and all the other things, it may be a little difficult sometimes for patients to put them on. There's a couple things to look at.

 

 

I think they're great to have maybe to screen your patients but really importantly, to make sure that the oral appliance is working after you've placed it. That's where I think that these home sleep testing units are great. It’s like your final X-ray after endo. You would never think of doing endo and not taking your final X-ray before you send them back to your referring source. This is the same thing. If the patient gets an oral appliance, it's a really good idea to see where your numbers are before you send them back to the physician that referred them to you to make sure it's working.

 

Howard:

That's how I mastered endodontics, is I mastered how to Photoshop my final X-ray.

 

Glennine:

There you go.

 

Howard:

I just did a really quick down and dirty root canal. Then, I Photoshopped the hell out of it and it just looks perfect. I'm pretty sure that’s the one I sent to the insurance company. You're in Henderson, Nevada. How far away is that from Vegas?

 

Glennine:

It's just about 15 miles up the road. The strip is just right down the street. It’s not too far.

 

Howard:

There’s a lot of institutes in Vegas. Do you do any sleep medicine on any of those? You got LVI there. You got Dr. Chen’s implants on neuromuscular. You're doing anything with any of those guys in Vegas?

 

Glennine:

Not yet. Dr. Bill Dickerson and I have talked a few times. My husband works for a TechScan which is a computerized bite sensor teeth scan.

 

Howard:

Sure, the big neuromuscular thing.

 

Glennine:

Yeah. It tests your bite. It takes a moving bite and …

 

Howard:

Your husband works for them?

 

Glennine:

My husband is the West Coast rep for TechScan. He spends a lot of time-

 

Howard:

Where’s TechScan out of? Is that Seattle?

 

Glennine:

It’s out of Boston.

 

Howard:

Boston. Who was the guy who started the neuromuscular, that started that company?

 

Glennine:

I don't know who started … I don't think TechScan was really a neuromuscular company. I think it’s more of testing your bite, timing versus force. I just spent the time with Dr. Gail Demko and she said that her husband was one of the founders of that because he was very focused on not just looking at articulating paper and how teeth come together but looking at timing and force. I don't know. I’ll have to ask my husband who actually originated that but-

 

Howard:

It seems to me, and maybe I’m completely wrong on this and if I'm wrong, you can e-mail me, howard@dentaltown.com or you can put the comments. When we post this on Dentaltown, there’s places to comment after it or even on YouTube or whatever. It seems like the dentists who always have the TechScan, they’re always, from the neuromuscular camp more than the Dawson-Pankey CR camp. Do you see that or not really?

 

Glennine:

When it comes to teeth scan or just-

 

Howard:

Yeah, when it comes to the TechScan. If they have the TechScan.

 

Glennine:

I think that they’re more focused on what happens with the muscles and where the teeth are settling. I think they're very focused on that but I know that Dawson has definitely promoted teeth scan in the past. I know teeth scans in a lot of different camps other than just neuromuscular. Speaking of that, like I said, my husband's been working a lot with LVI and with Bill Dickerson so I know that what’s nice about what they're doing is that they're mentioning sleep in every course that they do now and airway is starting to become a big focus.

 

 

It’s really nice because as I mentioned before, Dr. Carstensen, he's teaching at Spears. He’s teaching at Pankey. They are very airway focused as well. I think what's nice about airways is bringing all the camp together. Yes, it's always been neuromuscular against CR and where does CO come into play and all of these different things but really, airway focused dentistry is starting to be the go-to. That's what everybody feels is most important and it is focusing on making sure that patients are breathing properly. I know there's a lot of research going on to see why people clench and brux and if it does have an airway component to it. It will be interesting to see that research and if anything is proven with that.

 

Howard:

What’s your husband’s name?

 

Glennine:

Shane. Shane Varga.

 

Howard:

Shane Varga. I wonder if I know him. Another question, do you think when you got started in this, all the dentists were 2D X-rays. We just had panos and [SATs 00:45:26] and PAs and now it’s 3D. Do you think CB CTT 3D X-rays is going to factor into this now?

 

Glennine:

Absolutely. I mean the things that all of these companies are coming out with airway volume and being able to see a before and after difference by bringing the mandible forward with an oral appliance and showing that airway volume difference in a CT scan, absolutely, it plays a huge role. Unfortunately, insurance companies are a lagging with feeling that it's medically necessary to do one so getting paid for doing airways volume on a sleep apnea patient may be ways away in regards to reimbursement from insurance but it is something that dentists should be taking X-rays, at least a panoramic X-ray to make sure that the teeth can support an oral appliance.

 

 

Those dentists that are doing cone beam for airway can break down the image into a panel and get some reimbursement back from the insurance for that. The imaging on these cone beams are absolutely phenomenal. I feel that it's a great way to educate patients and even if you're not taking a before and after scan on each patient, showing them on a patient that you've done before, showing them the difference in the airway volume of before and after, I think it's awesome. It's definitely a wave of the future and where it’s headed.

 

Howard:

When you're talking about medical billing, you're talking about Medicare, not Medicaid.

 

Glennine:

Yeah, Medicaid for sleep specific doesn’t have, in what I've experienced across the US, doesn't have any reimbursement for an oral appliance but Medicare does.

 

Howard:

For international viewers, because this is 83% is US dentists listening to you now but 17% are from 141 other countries so the United States as a federal government with Medicare which was started for over 65 and then the individual states started Medicaid which was originally for the poor and now, America's kind of merging closer together with Obamacare. Most countries have just one national insurance program, Canada, Australia, all of Europe. America is extremely complicated. You're saying this is just from the federal Washington, DC Medicare which is basically for 65 and over, isn't it?

 

Glennine:

Correct, or anyone that has any kind of kidney disease, retinol kidney disease or any kind of-

 

Howard:

Disability?

 

Glennine:

Exactly.

 

Howard:

Disability. Interesting. Is Obamacare going to change much of this? Is that a game changer for you and the insurance Medicare billing?

 

Glennine:

No, not necessarily. My main goal is to focus on what Medicare is doing and really following Medicare guidelines and trying to set up offices that are taking Medicare patients to be able to have their guidelines set with that. Again, it’s the strictest of all strict so as long as they’re following that, I think that things are on great track.

 

Howard:

Do they need to buy new software? Most dental offices are running software by Dentrix from Henry Schein or Eaglesoft from Patterson or Softdent or Open Dental. Are they going to do this on those or do they need a separate piece of software?

 

Glennine:

I actually just wrote an article in regards to this very topic in Dental Sleep Practice magazine. It talks all about exactly what you're just talking about. In my opinion-

 

Howard:

You should post that on Dentaltown.

 

Glennine:

Yeah, I’d love to.

 

Howard:

Dentaltown has 53 categories. It has endo, perio, pedo. The very last one is TMD, TMJ, sleep medicine.

 

Glennine:

Wonderful.

 

Howard:

It’s number 51. If you went in there and I wish you’d post that.

 

Glennine:

I will.

 

Howard:

What did your article say?

 

Glennine:

Basically, my article, I said number one, dentists have an exception for filing claim forms to medical insurance on paper. The rest of the world, the rest of the medical community has to file claims electronically but a dentist has an exception. A dentist could just get a claim form and hand write everything out and mail it snail mail. They can get the job done that way but since the insurance companies are seeing electronic claims every single day and they get a paper claim every once in a while, it's very advantageous for a dentist to go in and do it electronically versus on paper.

 

 

In my opinion, what I have seen with the dental insurances is that most of them are not able to send an electronic claim form through a medical clearinghouse. They're able to print the claim form on paper but to submit it to through a medical clearinghouse, it's not quite there yet. I don't like to rely on the dental softwares to do that. If it was just going to print a claim, then I could probably get away with doing it like that. Yeah, there are softwares like Dental Writer. There’s a great one, DS3, Dental Sleep Solution, which is a very specific software for dental sleep medicine. You can definitely purchase one of those systems and use those systems to be able to accomplish this.

 

 

Again, I'd like to see what my offices are doing. One thing that a lot of offices don't realize what they could do is go directly to a medical clearinghouse. You go directly to a medical clearinghouse. Typically, it's free to sign up and then you pay a minimum fee per claim anywhere from 40 cents to $1. You fill up the claim form, you send it electronically, that information gets processed. It’s a pretty fast and easy thing.

 

 

Where it becomes a little bit difficult is you have to understand how to fill up the claim form properly because for dental sleep medicine, it is very specific. There's documentation. We need to show that the patient have had a sleep test, that we have a written prescription from a physician for the oral appliance. In some cases, we have to state medical necessity. For example, if the patient is mild sleep apnea, there's things we have to show the insurance that they're sick enough to warrant the oral appliance.

 

 

Those types of things, it's great when you have a system like Dental Writer, DS3 because it pulls that information together while you're filing the claim to the insurance company. You can also fax it. You have several options. I think that if a dentist is serious about doing this, they should look at one of the software systems because it's like running your practice with Microsoft Outlook versus running your practice with Dentrix. These softwares are created to help you and so it's a good thing but everyone has options.

 

Howard:

I don't want to be in trouble with picking favorites but you’d mentioned Dental Writer. That is Rose Niemer’s, right?

 

Glennine:

Nierman.

 

Howard:

Nierman. Then, you mentioned DS. Rose is out of Florida, you said.

 

Glennine:

Florida.

 

Howard:

Who’s DS3?

 

Glennine:

DS3 is Dr. Gy Yatros and Dr. Richard Drake.

 

Howard:

We podcast interviewed them.

 

Glennine:

They’ve got their own-

 

Howard:

Did we podcast interview Rose?

 

Ryan:

Not Rose but we did Gy Yatros.

 

Glennine:

I think you might have done Rose a while back.

 

Ryan:

How do you spell her last name?

 

Howard:

N-I-E-R-M-A-N. Yeah. I’ve seen these people so many times.

 

Glennine:

I know. I hear you.

 

Howard:

Yeah. She was episode 40.

 

Ryan:

Then, Gy and Richard was …

 

Howard:

Gy and Richard.

 

Glennine:

To answer your question, I think Dental Writer is great for everything in a dental practice because a lot of dentists are doing TMD and bone grafts and implants and that kind of thing. Dental Writer is really created to be an overall for billing anything in the dental practice to medical. I think it’s really great for that whereas DS3 is really focused only on sleep. Their main goal is dental sleep medicine. I think they're both great. For any dentists, I would contact both and see what you could do to get a demo or a trial run to see what's best for you. Now, obviously, I worked for Dental Writer for 10 years so I know that software like the back of my hand. I'm able to do anything I need in that system whereas DS3, I'm not as familiar with but they’re both great products.

 

Howard:

Nice. Gosh, you've covered everything. I can't think of anything else you haven’t talked about. I always feel like I'm not smart enough to ask you all the questions, the right questions because you're so far over my head on this. Is there any great questions that I wasn't smart enough to ask that you should just ask yourself right now?

 

Glennine:

No. I think you covered it. I mean if I had to leave all of the dentists in this country with anything, I would just tell them start looking at dental sleep medicine. Definitely, the ADA, I'll be speaking with Dr. Carstensen there at the main meeting in Denver. Come by and watch that course.

 

Howard:

When’s the ADA … Next year’s annual convention is in Denver?

 

Glennine:

Correct.

 

Howard:

Next October?

 

Glennine:

Yes, in October.

 

Howard:

Peyton Manning will be the keynote speaker?

 

Glennine:

I wish. That would be awesome. I’m a diehard Denver Bronco fan.

 

Howard:

Hey, you don’t have to answer this. At the end of this seminar, I can have my son, Ryan, edit it out if it’s too personal but why are you wearing braces at 40? Does this have to do with sleep, cosmetics or is that rude for me to ask?

 

Glennine:

All of the above. I was a bicuspid extraction ortho case at 15. As I started to evolve in my adult life, I was a major clencher. I broke down all of my molars. I mean I just cusped them out and they were cracking and everything else. I decreased my vertical dimension quite a bit so I was looking a lot older. I've got a smaller area here. Yeah, my airway was not good at all. I actually went to LVI and Dr. Mark Duncan posted my posterior crowns for me and built up my vertical a little bit, felt much, much better. Cosmetically, it looked great but I had an open bike in the front.

 

 

Of course, we could have done full mouth reconstruction and done veneers all the way across and closed everything but I opted to do ortho because my teeth are healthy. I mean everything in the front was all healthy so I opted to do ortho. Now, we're doing some expansion to bring back a little bit of that space and really it’s all about inclining my teeth so instead of being lingually inclined, we're going to bow those out a little bit. It is a little combination of cosmetics and some airway but I'll be so excited once I do get these things off. Hopefully, it’ll be-

 

Howard:

I want you to know you just HIPAA violated yourself and I’m going to have to … HIPAA’s going to find you for disclosing your own personal information.

 

Glennine:

Oh my goodness.

 

Howard:

Was this a HIPAA … No, I was just kidding. It’s funny how things change. Thirty years ago when I was in school, when you got out, there were orthodontists all around Phoenix. Almost every single patient there, they come in just for bicuspid extraction. Now, it's probably down to maybe 15% maybe.

 

Glennine:

That's great and I want it to be 0% because we can do expansion. We can do things to open up the mouth which is opening up the airway instead of collapsing. There’s an awesome orthodontist in California, Dr. William Hang, Bill Hang. He has dedicated his life to reversing what traditional ortho does and getting the bicuspid areas back in. Bill Hang has a quote that says all orthodontics is retraction so if anyone’s an ortho, they're pulling everything back into the airway. Unless you're going to be doing ortho to do some expansion, everything is pulling back into that airway. I like listening to Bill Hang a lot and I really … I want to get my airway a little bit open and get my angulation of my teeth out a little bit. That's where I'm coming from.

 

Howard:

See, all the orthodontists that see me, they say they just want to wire my mouth shut so I stop eating and lose my big fat belly.

 

Glennine:

I don't believe.

 

Howard:

They say I don't care about your angles of your teeth. You just need to stop eating. Where's William Hang out of?

 

Glennine:

He’s in California. I should know. Him and his wife and I, we sit on the foundation of Airway Health. It’s a brand new foundation that was founded by Dr. Howard Hindin and Michael Gelb out in New York. I know Bill Hang is, I want to say out in the LA area but he’s dedicated his last 30 years of his life really focused on airway and reversing the traditional orthodontics.

 

Howard:

You are just a plethora of information. You're just an amazing mind. This stuff just flows out of you like Beethoven playing the piano. If you'd know all these people, whatever, and we need to do more … The reason online CE is so explosive is because you can watch them on your iPhone. If you download the Dentaltown app, now you got 210,000 dentists in your pocket but if we hit this CE icon, we put up 350 courses. They've been viewed half a million times.

 

Glennine:

That's so awesome.

 

Howard:

500,000 times in pretty much every country on earth. I mean a lot of these countries you’ll look at, me and Ryan have to go to Google Maps and find out where it is in Africa or Asia or whatever. It seems like you're the most connected person I've ever talked to in sleep medicine. You're sitting in all these boards and know all these people but tell them that if they need to get more messages out about sleep medicine to just email Howard Goldstein. I’m howard@dentaltown.com. The other Howard went with hogo, H-O-G-O, for Howard Goldstein. He's hogo@dentaltown.com. I'm howard@dentaltown.com. Let’s do some online CE courses so when these guys are sitting there watching the ball game on Sunday drinking beer, they can hold their iPhone on their left hand and be multitasking with sleep medicine and listening to you.

 

Glennine:

That’s great. That sounds great.

 

Howard:

It’s Glennie, right? Glennine.

 

Glennine:

It’s like Jeanine but Glennine.

 

Howard:

Glennine Varga.

 

Glennine:

The last thing I want to say is I do have a seminar that is going on across the country and it's held at universities. My next seminar is at Tufts University at the end of April. That's with Jan Palmer. Our website for that is DSMITT which stands for interactive team training so dental sleep medicine interactive team training.com and all of our dates are there. Jan is just a wealth of knowledge. She sits on the board of Medicare. Any dentists that’s doing anything in dental sleep medicine when it comes to insurance or billing Medicare, this course is a must-see. It’s an excellent course.

 

Howard:

What’s her name?

 

Glennine:

Her name is Jan Palmer. She’s the office manager of Dr. Gail Demko out of Weston, Massachusetts.

 

Howard:

When she goes to a restaurant, does she drink an Arnold Palmer or just a beer?

 

Glennine:

I don't know. I’m actually-

 

Howard:

Is she a Bud Light woman or does she stick to the Arnold Palmer?

 

Glennine:

That course is amazing because it brings both myself and Jan together. It’s the administrative aspects of dental sleep medicine so any office that’s interested, we'd love to have them there.

 

Howard:

Fantastic and that was dsmiti.com.

 

Glennine:

ITT. Interactive team training.

 

Howard:

ITT.com. It’s interactive …

 

Glennine:

Team training.

 

Howard:

Interactive team training. Then, your website is dsmbootcamp.com.

 

Glennine:

Correct.

 

Howard:

What if someone wants to e-mail or call you? Do you give you out any of that information?

 

Glennine:

Absolutely. My e-mail is g@dsmbootcamp.com and my telephone number is 702-672-4490.

 

Howard:

I love your e-mail, just G for Glennine.

 

Glennine:

Just G.

 

Howard:

@dsm, which is dental sleep medicine bootcamp.com.

 

Glennine:

That’s correct.

 

Howard:

Glennine, seriously man, you are amazing. Thank you so much for spending an hour today with me for the show. That was just truly amazing.

 

Glennine:

Thank you and I’ll go on Dentaltown and post everything I need to post and be more interactive there.

 

Howard:

Yeah. When you make a post, there’s an icon up there so you can drop these links in there so that they’d just click the DSMITT or the dsmbootcamp.com. Also, do you have any of these videos on YouTube?

 

Glennine:

What videos?

 

Howard:

Any of or any videos on your website or anything like that?

 

Glennine:

Yeah, I’m working on it. I’ll point them out there.

 

Howard:

The neat thing you can also do on Dentaltown is when you go to a YouTube video, when you click share, you can grab that link and if you drop it in the booth, it pulls up the whole video.

 

Glennine:

Perfect.

 

Howard:

All right, Glennine. Thank you so much again for an hour. That was an amazing hour.

 

Glennine:

Thank you.

 

Howard:

Okay, have a great day. Bye-bye.

 

Glennine:

Okay, you too. Bye-bye.

 


More Like This

Total Blog Activity

21
Total Bloggers
1,330
Total Blog Posts
1,286
Total Podcasts
1,236
Total Videos

Sponsors

Townie® Poll

Has your practice undergone a redesign or remodel in the last five years?

  

Site Help

Sally Gross, Member Services
Phone: +1-480-445-9710
Email: sally@farranmedia.com

Follow Orthotown

Mobile App

WITH ORTHOTOWN . . . NO ORTHODONTIST WILL EVER HAVE TO PRACTICE SOLO AGAIN

WWW.ORTHOTOWN.COM - WHERE THE ORTHODONTIC COMMUNITY LIVES

9633 S. 48th Street Suite 200 • Phoenix, AZ 85044 · Phone: +1-480-598-0001 · Fax: +1-480-598-3450
©1999-2019 Orthotown, L.L.C., a division of Farran Media, L.L.C. · All Rights Reserved